3 Briefs, Capitalization, Names

3.1 Basic Briefs

Briefs exist for many of the common words and common phrases in the Plover dictionary. For most briefs, parts of the word and phrase are “dropped” so everything fits in a single stroke. Take for example the word “consider” which is briefed as “KR.”

The brief for the article a is a special case where the brief AEU looks “longer” than the word. In Plover theory, the AEU combination is used for long a sounds. In addition, A is used as a prefix stroke.

AEU

a a a a

If the stroke A is used rather than AEU, Plover will not insert a space before the next word. As a result, while AEU K will write “a can,” A K will write “acan.”

AEU K-

A K-

a can a can a can
Common Briefs
Word Stroke Notes
a AEU the article “a” and all long “a” sounds in Plover theory use AEU. However, when “a” is part of another brief, it is A.
this TH- THis
that THA THAt
there THR- THeRe
think THEU THInk
through THRU like how it sounds
what WHA WHAt
which WEU WHIch
when WH- WHen
were WR- WeRe
where W-R WheRe
whether WHR- WHetheR
would WO WOuld
could KO COuld
should SHO SHOuld
yes KWRE “ye,” the stroke KWRES is for “yes, sir”
my PHEU “m-i”
by PWEU “b-i”
any TPHEU “n-i”
new TPHU “n-u”
into TPHAO
little HREUL “lil”
many PHAEPB
very SRE
because PWAUS

3.1.1 Combining briefs

The more common briefs can be “combined” together if they do not violate steno order, and if the particular chord is not used for another word. For example, “are” and “you” can be joined together for the stroke RU to write “are you” in one stroke rather than two.

RU

are you are you are you are you

Another example is “will you.”

HRU

will you will you will you will you

Notice how repeating HRU twice will cause Plover to write Lulu rather than will you.

Some strokes when doubled are actually for writing out other words as a “multi-stroke” word. In Plover, a repeat stroke is usually found to distinguish a word as a word and also as a name, for example pat and Pat. There are many such cases with words as seen in the table below. One way to resolve this is to add a space with S-P between the two strokes. Then will you will you will be written with:

HRU S-P HRU

will you will you will you will you

One disadvantage of this method is that the writer has to know the double stroke will write an unwanted word and prevents it from occurring by using S-P before the fact.

A second way is to use a Plover command to add a retrospective space. Create a new stroke in the Plover dictionary which adds a space retrospectively. The recommendation is to use the stroke AFPS and the command is {*?}. Using the command, will you will you is written with:

HRU HRU AFPS

will you will you will you will you

While the theory concepts have not been covered yet, practice with these compound words and using spaces to separate them.

PHAEUL PHAPB AFPS

mail man mail man mail man mail man

RUPB WAEU AFPS

run way run way run way run way

There is also the “retrospectively delete space” command {*!} which is recommended to be set to the stroke TK-FPS.

“Had” can be joined to “a,” “the,” and “you.”

HA

had a had a had a had a

H-T

had the had the had the had the

HU

had you had you had you had you

While HEU as a brief for “had I” makes logical sense, HEU is the stroke for the word “hi.”

In the exercises below, would you, should you, and could you appear. Following from the examples above on combining briefs, would you can be written as:

WOU

would you would you would you would you

and should you can be written with:

SHOU

should you should you should you should you

However, an attempt to write could you with KOU will result in cow, and not could you. This is because in the Plover dictionary, KOU has a translation set to cow and not could you.

KOU

KO U

To change Plover to output could you for KOU instead of cow, either the main.json could be modified or an entry added to a dictionary which has higher precedence than main.json. Adding to user.json is the recommended approach. Precedence of dictionaries can be seen on the Plover window. The lower the number, the higher the precedence. A translation from a dictionary on top will override any translations from the lower dictionaries.

3.2 Punctuation

Strokes for punctuation are more arbitrary and require more memorization than strokes for word briefs.

Plover uses a stroke with both hands, TP-PL for a period, with space and automatic capitalization for the next work, but variants such as using the top right row -FPLT also exist.

TP-PL

He is a cat. He is a cat. He is a cat. He is a cat.

The stroke for a comma is KW-BG.

KW-BG

Common Punctuation
Symbol Stroke Notes
. TP-PL or P-P TP-PL for a period with a space, and automatic capitalization of the next word. P-P for a period with no space
, KW-BG
? H-R
! SKHRAPL
: STPH-FPLT or KHR-PB KHR-PB for colon with no space after.
; SK W R*RBGS
AE or A*E A*E for apostrophe with no space after.
’s AES
TK-RB 2 en-dashes as em-dash

3.3 Capitalization

Plover automatically capitalizes after a period TP-PL or other ending punctuation, or a new line R-R. Try to write a word, then a period, and then another word. Then use the R-R stroke which is equivalent to enter on the QWERTY keyboard before writing another word. Then try writing a period by P-P followed by another word to see how the word is not capitalized.

KPA

Capitalized words are written by first stroking KPA and then the word stroke. Plover will automatically insert a space before the first letter. When a space is not desired, stroking KPA* will capitalize the next word without a space.

He, a cat. He, a cat. He, a cat. He, a cat.

Capital letters are frequently followed by a . when used as initials, which is likely more common in legal settings than general writing. In Plover, adding *FPLT to the stroke will add a period after the capital letter.

TP*FPLT

F.

The initials will “attach” to each other without a space between when *FPLT ending strokes are done in succession.

TP*FPLT P*FPLT

F.P.

However, they will not attach to other words.

TP*FPLT S-

F. is

S- H*FPLT

is H.

The one exception is A*FPLT which translates to amount rather than A. However, as AFPLT also translates to amount, setting A*FPLT to A. would be plausible if needed.

3.4 Names

Common first and last names are included in Plover’s dictionary. Some names can be written directly with a stroke, following Plover theory rules, such as Brad PWAD, Jeff SKWREF and Carl KARL. For example, Greg is written as TKPWREG.

TKPWREG

Greg Greg Greg Greg

Other common names include Sam SAPL and John SKWROPB.

In Plover theory, the ending consonant m is written by the combination of -P and -L keys (see 13).

SAPL

Sam Sam Sam Sam

The ending consonant -n is written by the combination of -P and -B keys (see 5).

SKWROPB

John John John John

When a proper name is also a word, the stroke for the name (capitalized) is frequently distinguished from the stroke for the word with the \(*\) key.

For example, the name Rob is stroked RO*B while the word rob (meaning to steal) is stroked rob.

ROB

RO*B

Rob Rob Rob Rob

The name Ray (with a long a sound) is stroke RA*EU to distinguish from the word ray stroked RAEU.

RA*EU

RAEU

Ray Ray Ray Ray

There are still others which use doubled strokes to write the name, extremely handy as repeating the stroke is faster and more efficient than pressing \(*\) and writing another stroke with the asterisk to correct the error.

One example is Ray which has an alternative stroke of RAEU/RAEU. When the first chord is pressed, RAEU, Plover will write ray, and when the second RAEU stroke is pressed, Plover will rewrite ray into Ray.

RAEU RAEU

Ray

Some names can only be stroked with a double stroke in the default Plover dictionary, such as Pat and Nat. With Pat, the stroke PAT is for the word pat, the stroke PA*T is to write path (see 15 on how to write -th endings).

Common Names
Name Stroke Note
Greg TKPWREG
Scott SKOT
Bess PWES
Liz HREUZ
Brad PWRAD
Jeff SKWREF
Joe SKWROE
Carl KARL
Sam SAPL
Tim TEUPL
John SKWROPB
Jane SKWHRAEUB
Jen SKWREPB
Ned TPHED
Ben PWEPB
Dan TKAPB
Sara SA/RA
Will W*EUL \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “will”
Bill PW*EUL or PWEUL/PWEUL \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “bill”
Rob RO*B \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “rob”
Grace TKPWRA*EUS \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “grace”
Ray RA*EU or RAEU/RAEU \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “ray”
Rose RO*ES the word “rose” is stroked ROEZ
Bob PWO*B \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “bob”
Mark PHA*RBG or PHARBG/PHARBG \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “mark”
Matt PHAT/PHAT or PHA*T/-T PHA*T by itself is a stroke for “math”
Doug TK*UG, TKOUG, TKO*UG or TKUG/TKUG The stroke TKUG is for the word “dug”
Jack SKWRA*BG or SKWRABG/SKWRABG \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “jack”
Nick TPH*EUBG or TPHEUBG/TPHEUBG \(*\) key to distinguish from the word “nick”
Pat PAT/PAT No \(*\) alternative stroke as PA*T is used for the word “path”
Nat TPHAT/TPHAT TPHAT by itself is a brief for “national”

3.5 Exercises

3.5.1 Write

  1. rha rha rha stra stra stra spra spra spra scra scra scra
  2. thra thra thra shra shra shra spla spla spla phra phra phra
  3. rhe rhe rhe stre stre stre spre spre spre scre scre scre
  4. thre thre thre shre shre shre sple sple sple phre phre phre
  5. rhi rhi rhi stri stri stri spri spri spri scri scri scri
  6. thri thri thri shri shri shri spli spli spli squa squa squa
  7. rho rho rho stro stro stro spro spro spro scro scro scro
  8. thro thro thro shro shro shro splo splo splo sque sque sque
  9. rhu rhu rhu stru stru stru spru spru spru scru scru scru
  10. thru thru thru shru shru shru splu splu splu squi squi squi
  11. a a a
  12. this this this
  13. that that that
  14. there there there
  15. through through through
  16. what what what
  17. which which which
  18. when when when
  19. were were were
  20. where where where
  21. whether whether whether
  22. would would would
  23. could could could
  24. should should should
  25. yes yes yes
  26. my my my
  27. by by by
  28. any any any
  29. new new new
  30. into into into
  31. little little little
  32. many many many
  33. very very very
  34. because because because

3.5.2 Play the crossword

3.5.3 Write with sound

Controls
  1. So we go. So we go. So we go.
  2. Go in. Go in. Go in.
  3. If he about in, I go. If he about in, I go. If he about in, I go.
  4. Where is Brad? Where is Brad? Where is Brad?
  5. Where is Jeff? Where is Jeff? Where is Jeff?
  6. Where is Joe? Where is Joe? Where is Joe?
  7. Where is Carl? Where is Carl? Where is Carl?
  8. Where is Sam? Where is Sam? Where is Sam?
  9. Where is Tim? Where is Tim? Where is Tim?
  10. Where is John? Where is John? Where is John?
  11. Where is Jane? Where is Jane? Where is Jane?
  12. Where is Jen? Where is Jen? Where is Jen?
  13. Where is Ned? Where is Ned? Where is Ned?
  14. Where is Ben? Where is Ben? Where is Ben?
  15. Where is Dan? Where is Dan? Where is Dan?
  16. Where is Sara? Where is Sara? Where is Sara?
  17. Where is Will? Where is Will? Where is Will?
  18. Where is Bill? Where is Bill? Where is Bill?
  19. Where is Rob? Where is Rob? Where is Rob?
  20. Where is Grace? Where is Grace? Where is Grace?
  21. Where is Ray? Where is Ray? Where is Ray?
  22. Where is Rose? Where is Rose? Where is Rose?
  23. Where is Bob? Where is Bob? Where is Bob?
  24. Where is Mark? Where is Mark? Where is Mark?
  25. Where is Matt? Where is Matt? Where is Matt?
  26. Where is Doug? Where is Doug? Where is Doug?
  27. Where is Jack? Where is Jack? Where is Jack?
  28. Where is Nick? Where is Nick? Where is Nick?
  29. Where is Pat? Where is Pat? Where is Pat?
  30. Where is Nat? Where is Nat? Where is Nat?
  31. There is Greg. There is Greg. There is Greg.
  32. There is Scott. There is Scott. There is Scott.
  33. There is Bess. There is Bess. There is Bess.
  34. There is Liz. There is Liz. There is Liz.
  35. There is Brad. There is Brad. There is Brad.
  36. There is Jeff. There is Jeff. There is Jeff.
  37. There is Joe. There is Joe. There is Joe.
  38. There is Carl. There is Carl. There is Carl.
  39. There is Sam. There is Sam. There is Sam.
  40. There is Tim. There is Tim. There is Tim.
  41. There is John. There is John. There is John.
  42. There is Jane. There is Jane. There is Jane.
  43. There is Jen. There is Jen. There is Jen.
  44. There is Ned There is Ned There is Ned
  45. There is Ben. There is Ben. There is Ben.
  46. There is Dan. There is Dan. There is Dan.
  47. There is Sara. There is Sara. There is Sara.
  48. There is Will. There is Will. There is Will.
  49. There is Bill. There is Bill. There is Bill.
  50. There is Rob. There is Rob. There is Rob.
  51. There is Grace. There is Grace. There is Grace.
  52. There is Ray. There is Ray. There is Ray.
  53. There is Rose. There is Rose. There is Rose.
  54. There is Bob. There is Bob. There is Bob.
  55. There is Mark. There is Mark. There is Mark.
  56. There is Matt. There is Matt. There is Matt.
  57. There is Doug. There is Doug. There is Doug.
  58. There is Jack. There is Jack. There is Jack.
  59. There is Nick. There is Nick. There is Nick.
  60. There is Pat. There is Pat. There is Pat.
  61. There is Nat. There is Nat. There is Nat.
  62. Is that Greg? Is that Greg? Is that Greg?
  63. Is that Scott? Is that Scott? Is that Scott?
  64. Is that Bess? Is that Bess? Is that Bess?
  65. Is that Liz? Is that Liz? Is that Liz?
  66. Is that Brad? Is that Brad? Is that Brad?
  67. Is that Jeff? Is that Jeff? Is that Jeff?
  68. Is that Joe? Is that Joe? Is that Joe?
  69. Is that Carl? Is that Carl? Is that Carl?
  70. Is that Sam? Is that Sam? Is that Sam?
  71. Is that Tim? Is that Tim? Is that Tim?
  72. Is that John? Is that John? Is that John?
  73. Is that Jane? Is that Jane? Is that Jane?
  74. Is that Jen? Is that Jen? Is that Jen?
  75. Is that Ned? Is that Ned? Is that Ned?
  76. Is that Ben? Is that Ben? Is that Ben?
  77. Is that Dan? Is that Dan? Is that Dan?
  78. Is that Sara? Is that Sara? Is that Sara?
  79. Is that Will? Is that Will? Is that Will?
  80. Is that Bill? Is that Bill? Is that Bill?
  81. Is that Rob? Is that Rob? Is that Rob?
  82. Is that Grace? Is that Grace? Is that Grace?
  83. Is that Ray? Is that Ray? Is that Ray?
  84. Is that Rose? Is that Rose? Is that Rose?
  85. Is that Bob? Is that Bob? Is that Bob?
  86. Is that Mark? Is that Mark? Is that Mark?
  87. Is that Matt? Is that Matt? Is that Matt?
  88. Is that Doug? Is that Doug? Is that Doug?
  89. Is that Jack? Is that Jack? Is that Jack?
  90. Is that Nick? Is that Nick? Is that Nick?
  91. Is that Pat? Is that Pat? Is that Pat?
  92. Is that Nat? Is that Nat? Is that Nat?
  93. It is Greg. It is Greg. It is Greg.
  94. It is Scott. It is Scott. It is Scott.
  95. It is Bess. It is Bess. It is Bess.
  96. It is Liz. It is Liz. It is Liz.
  97. It is Brad. It is Brad. It is Brad.
  98. It is Jeff. It is Jeff. It is Jeff.
  99. It is Joe. It is Joe. It is Joe.
  100. It is Carl. It is Carl. It is Carl.
  101. It is Sam. It is Sam. It is Sam.
  102. It is Tim. It is Tim. It is Tim.
  103. It is John. It is John. It is John.
  104. It is Jane. It is Jane. It is Jane.
  105. It is Jen. It is Jen. It is Jen.
  106. It is Ned It is Ned It is Ned
  107. It is Ben. It is Ben. It is Ben.
  108. It is Dan. It is Dan. It is Dan.
  109. It is Sara. It is Sara. It is Sara.
  110. It is Will. It is Will. It is Will.
  111. It is Bill. It is Bill. It is Bill.
  112. It is Rob. It is Rob. It is Rob.
  113. It is Grace. It is Grace. It is Grace.
  114. It is Ray. It is Ray. It is Ray.
  115. It is Rose. It is Rose. It is Rose.
  116. It is Bob. It is Bob. It is Bob.
  117. It is Mark. It is Mark. It is Mark.
  118. It is Matt. It is Matt. It is Matt.
  119. It is Doug. It is Doug. It is Doug.
  120. It is Jack. It is Jack. It is Jack.
  121. It is Nick. It is Nick. It is Nick.
  122. It is Pat. It is Pat. It is Pat.
  123. It is Nat. It is Nat. It is Nat.
  124. Could you, Greg? Could you, Greg? Could you, Greg?
  125. Could you, Scott? Could you, Scott? Could you, Scott?
  126. Could you, Bess? Could you, Bess? Could you, Bess?
  127. Could you, Liz? Could you, Liz? Could you, Liz?
  128. Could you, Brad? Could you, Brad? Could you, Brad?
  129. Could you, Jeff? Could you, Jeff? Could you, Jeff?
  130. Could you, Joe? Could you, Joe? Could you, Joe?
  131. Could you, Carl? Could you, Carl? Could you, Carl?
  132. Could you, Sam? Could you, Sam? Could you, Sam?
  133. Could you, Tim? Could you, Tim? Could you, Tim?
  134. Could you, John? Could you, John? Could you, John?
  135. Could you, Jane? Could you, Jane? Could you, Jane?
  136. Could you, Jen? Could you, Jen? Could you, Jen?
  137. Could you, Ned? Could you, Ned? Could you, Ned?
  138. Could you, Ben? Could you, Ben? Could you, Ben?
  139. Could you, Dan? Could you, Dan? Could you, Dan?
  140. Could you, Sara? Could you, Sara? Could you, Sara?
  141. Could you, Will? Could you, Will? Could you, Will?
  142. Could you, Bill? Could you, Bill? Could you, Bill?
  143. Could you, Rob? Could you, Rob? Could you, Rob?
  144. Could you, Grace? Could you, Grace? Could you, Grace?
  145. Could you, Ray? Could you, Ray? Could you, Ray?
  146. Could you, Rose? Could you, Rose? Could you, Rose?
  147. Could you, Bob? Could you, Bob? Could you, Bob?
  148. Could you, Mark? Could you, Mark? Could you, Mark?
  149. Could you, Matt? Could you, Matt? Could you, Matt?
  150. Could you, Doug? Could you, Doug? Could you, Doug?
  151. Could you, Jack? Could you, Jack? Could you, Jack?
  152. Could you, Nick? Could you, Nick? Could you, Nick?
  153. Could you, Pat? Could you, Pat? Could you, Pat?
  154. Could you, Nat? Could you, Nat? Could you, Nat?
  155. Would you, Greg? Would you, Greg? Would you, Greg?
  156. Would you, Scott? Would you, Scott? Would you, Scott?
  157. Would you, Bess? Would you, Bess? Would you, Bess?
  158. Would you, Liz? Would you, Liz? Would you, Liz?
  159. Would you, Brad? Would you, Brad? Would you, Brad?
  160. Would you, Jeff? Would you, Jeff? Would you, Jeff?
  161. Would you, Joe? Would you, Joe? Would you, Joe?
  162. Would you, Carl? Would you, Carl? Would you, Carl?
  163. Would you, Sam? Would you, Sam? Would you, Sam?
  164. Would you, Tim? Would you, Tim? Would you, Tim?
  165. Would you, John? Would you, John? Would you, John?
  166. Would you, Jane? Would you, Jane? Would you, Jane?
  167. Would you, Jen? Would you, Jen? Would you, Jen?
  168. Would you, Ned? Would you, Ned? Would you, Ned?
  169. Would you, Ben? Would you, Ben? Would you, Ben?
  170. Would you, Dan? Would you, Dan? Would you, Dan?
  171. Would you, Sara? Would you, Sara? Would you, Sara?
  172. Would you, Will? Would you, Will? Would you, Will?
  173. Would you, Bill? Would you, Bill? Would you, Bill?
  174. Would you, Rob? Would you, Rob? Would you, Rob?
  175. Would you, Grace? Would you, Grace? Would you, Grace?
  176. Would you, Ray? Would you, Ray? Would you, Ray?
  177. Would you, Rose? Would you, Rose? Would you, Rose?
  178. Would you, Bob? Would you, Bob? Would you, Bob?
  179. Would you, Mark? Would you, Mark? Would you, Mark?
  180. Would you, Matt? Would you, Matt? Would you, Matt?
  181. Would you, Doug? Would you, Doug? Would you, Doug?
  182. Would you, Jack? Would you, Jack? Would you, Jack?
  183. Would you, Nick? Would you, Nick? Would you, Nick?
  184. Would you, Pat? Would you, Pat? Would you, Pat?
  185. Would you, Nat? Would you, Nat? Would you, Nat?
  186. Should you, Greg? Should you, Greg? Should you, Greg?
  187. Should you, Scott? Should you, Scott? Should you, Scott?
  188. Should you, Bess? Should you, Bess? Should you, Bess?
  189. Should you, Liz? Should you, Liz? Should you, Liz?
  190. Should you, Brad? Should you, Brad? Should you, Brad?
  191. Should you, Jeff? Should you, Jeff? Should you, Jeff?
  192. Should you, Joe? Should you, Joe? Should you, Joe?
  193. Should you, Carl? Should you, Carl? Should you, Carl?
  194. Should you, Sam? Should you, Sam? Should you, Sam?
  195. Should you, Tim? Should you, Tim? Should you, Tim?
  196. Should you, John? Should you, John? Should you, John?
  197. Should you, Jane? Should you, Jane? Should you, Jane?
  198. Should you, Jen? Should you, Jen? Should you, Jen?
  199. Should you, Nen? Should you, Nen? Should you, Nen?
  200. Should you, Ben? Should you, Ben? Should you, Ben?
  201. Should you, Dan? Should you, Dan? Should you, Dan?
  202. Should you, Sara? Should you, Sara? Should you, Sara?
  203. Should you, Will? Should you, Will? Should you, Will?
  204. Should you, Bill? Should you, Bill? Should you, Bill?
  205. Should you, Rob? Should you, Rob? Should you, Rob?
  206. Should you, Grace? Should you, Grace? Should you, Grace?
  207. Should you, Ray? Should you, Ray? Should you, Ray?
  208. Should you, Rose? Should you, Rose? Should you, Rose?
  209. Should you, Bob? Should you, Bob? Should you, Bob?
  210. Should you, Mark? Should you, Mark? Should you, Mark?
  211. Should you, Matt? Should you, Matt? Should you, Matt?
  212. Should you, Doug? Should you, Doug? Should you, Doug?
  213. Should you, Jack? Should you, Jack? Should you, Jack?
  214. Should you, Nick? Should you, Nick? Should you, Nick?
  215. Should you, Pat? Should you, Pat? Should you, Pat?
  216. Should you, Nat? Should you, Nat? Should you, Nat?
  217. Greg, you go! Greg, you go! Greg, you go!
  218. Scott, you go! Scott, you go! Scott, you go!
  219. Bess, you go! Bess, you go! Bess, you go!
  220. Liz, you go! Liz, you go! Liz, you go!
  221. Brad, you go! Brad, you go! Brad, you go!
  222. Jeff, you go! Jeff, you go! Jeff, you go!
  223. Joe, you go! Joe, you go! Joe, you go!
  224. Carl, you go! Carl, you go! Carl, you go!
  225. Sam, you go! Sam, you go! Sam, you go!
  226. Tim, you go! Tim, you go! Tim, you go!
  227. John, you go! John, you go! John, you go!
  228. Jane, you go! Jane, you go! Jane, you go!
  229. Jen, you go! Jen, you go! Jen, you go!
  230. Ned, you go! Ned, you go! Ned, you go!
  231. Ben, you go! Ben, you go! Ben, you go!
  232. Dan, you go! Dan, you go! Dan, you go!
  233. Sara, you go! Sara, you go! Sara, you go!
  234. Will, you go! Will, you go! Will, you go!
  235. Bill, you go! Bill, you go! Bill, you go!
  236. Rob, you go! Rob, you go! Rob, you go!
  237. Grace, you go! Grace, you go! Grace, you go!
  238. Ray, you go! Ray, you go! Ray, you go!
  239. Rose, you go! Rose, you go! Rose, you go!
  240. Bob, you go! Bob, you go! Bob, you go!
  241. Mark, you go! Mark, you go! Mark, you go!
  242. Matt, you go! Matt, you go! Matt, you go!
  243. Doug, you go! Doug, you go! Doug, you go!
  244. Jack, you go! Jack, you go! Jack, you go!
  245. Nick, you go! Nick, you go! Nick, you go!
  246. Pat, you go! Pat, you go! Pat, you go!
  247. Nat, you go! Nat, you go! Nat, you go!

3.5.4 Write random sentences

A random subset of sentences will be synthesized. Be patient with the synthesis. It will take a few seconds, especially the first time. The loweest possible WPM is 80, so to decrease overall WPM, increase word gap.

Show generated text
Press submit to generate text

3.6 Summary

  • Learn common briefs using the left hand and vowel keys
  • Learn common punctuation
  • Learn how to write common names, and how they may be stroked in different ways
  • Learn how to add spaces when needed retrospectively
  • Learn how to write capital letters, capital words and initials